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Gravity – a gold mine of VFX

Published on June 3, 2014, by in VFX.

Film makers have always strived to push the limits of creative possibilities. Alfonso Cuaron’s VFX wonder, Gravity emphasises not only the advancement of technology but also the extent of imagination that a film maker can bring alive on screen. Dominating the nominations at this year’s Oscars & winning the award in seven categories, Gravity became a landmark in VFX development & story telling. Visualising the film The concept for Gravity was a difficult but not impossible. Cuaron was sure of his story & worked as per his imagination to create a stunning output that impressed the audience & the critics. Framestore Visual Effects Studio Framestore was the team behind the stunning visuals & computer graphics in the movie. They developed all the technology necessary to make the movie possible. Almost 90% of the movie was made by computer graphics. To the average audience the scenes would look amazing but to

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Animated Oscar is Frozen

Published on June 3, 2014, by in Animation.

Walt Disney Animation Studios, a renowned name in the world of animation, won an Oscar in the Best Animated Feature category in 1939 for ‘Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs’. Since then it has won more Oscars in the same category but for Disney-Pixar productions like Brave & Ratatouille. After 75 years Disney repeated its win this year with its musical masterpiece, Frozen. What was so special about the movie? How was it able to evoke tremendous response from the audience & make huge profits? Here are a few things that made the movie a smashing hit. Plot As opposed to the regular Disney stories, this one is based on not one but two princesses – Elsa & Anna. It is not the traditional boy-meets-girl fairytale. Instead it is about the relationship between two sisters & their battle to stay loyal to each other, even when Prince Charming comes along.

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Storyboarding: Enhancing Artistic Vision

Published on May 7, 2014, by in Animation.

Making an animation feature is fun. But it requires a lot of planning & hard work. Storyboarding is the first & the most important step of this process. A storyboard is an organized series of drawings that detail the story & other important aspects like sound effects, music score, lighting & special effects. With the right training, you can build a career as a storyboard artist in production houses, television channels, ad agencies, website & gaming studios & others. Why is storyboarding so special Storyboard is an organised portrayal of the story through graphic drawings & pictures. It is a series of black & white or coloured artwork or sequence of images which depict motion, action in a scene & the landscape of the story. When required, you can also add dialogues within the framework to ensure that the scene can be designed as imagined by the story teller/animator. Storyboarding

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Stop Motion Animation: Another Approach to Animation

Published on November 6, 2013, by in Animation.

The world of animation has witnessed many changes over the years. From hand-drawn animation to 3D animation, it has evolved dramatically. In this competitive era of animation as a career, the industry is demanding technical skills, a good understanding of art and aesthetics, and a unique creative style. In today’s times, students focus on software knowledge and technologies to make their animation films. They rarely experiment with various other mediums of animation. One such medium of animation is stop-motion animation. It is the term used to describe the form of animation that is created by physically manipulating real world objects and photographing them, one frame at a time, to create the illusion of movement when the series of frames are played as a continuous sequence. There are various types of stop-motion animation. Some of them are: Claymation (Clay Animation) Clay animation is a unique form of stop-motion animation that uses

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Journey of Medical Animation (Part-2)

Published on August 21, 2013, by in Animation.

In our previous blog, we discussed how Medical Animation evolved. This part discusses the software used in Medical Animation and the career opportunities in the field. Era of 2D Animation 2D animation or two-dimensional animation is the creation of moving pictures, using consecutive frames of images. These successive images are placed at a rate of 24 frames per second. 2D animation is the preferred way to present medical illustrations. 2D medical animators use charts, posters, cartoons, and diagrammatic illustrations that show biological and medical processes, along with patient education booklets, newsletters and brochures that convey best practices for good health. The most popular 2D software include: Karbon: This is a scalable vector drawing application that allows artists to create complex drawings and turn them into high quality illustrations without losing image quality. Inkscape: This is an open source vector graphics editor with capabilities similar to Illustrator, CorelDraw, and Xara X.

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Journey of Medical Animation (Part-1)

Published on August 21, 2013, by in Animation.

Animation is an exceptional form of art that offers  significant information about the appearance of an object as well as its movement and interaction with its surroundings. It facilitates the artist to employ his complete imagination to generate remarkable impact. Earlier the source of inspiration for animation was nature. Animators observed the movement of living organisms and then built animations for industries other than Media & Entertainment. With the  advancement in computer applications,  came in the new automated systems. A range of sensors (mechanical, optical or magnetic) have been used to record the movements of organisms, which convert it in to animated characters. This course of action is generally known as ‘motion capture’. Animation has provided new horizons in the field of medical studies, clinical diagnostics, surgical trainings, drug delivery and immunology. Medical animation is the simplest and best way for professionals and the general public to understand higher level of

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How to Shoot a Miniature Effect

Published on June 19, 2013, by in VFX.

Miniature is a very common term in the process of visual-effects film making. In the process of miniature shoot the real life object is duplicated to a smaller size. The concept of miniature has been used in many Bollywood and Hollywood films like Indiana Jones, Star Wars, Cliffhanger, Terminator, Batman Begins, Ra-One and many more. Shooting miniatures is a very creative and interesting process. One needs to understand perspective, size, scale and proportion. There are a lot of visual effect courses that help you understand the basic and core elementsto help you enhance your visual effect skills. It’s not just a simple or small-size toy or model, which is used in miniature shoots. In fact, the details have to be more precise in the miniature sets/models, so that it should not look like a toy after the shoot. How We Shot a Miniature Effect? Inspired by old documentaries on miniatures,

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Gaming Gets Real In 3D!

Published on March 18, 2013, by in Gaming.

For gaming lovers across the globe, 3D animation has changed the way games are being played. From being simple drawings with a few attributes characters now come alive with features, settings and a whole gamut of characteristics that can be controlled and changed. Gaming animation is rich and layered, featuring both Full Motion Video cut-scenes and In-Game Engine animation. The input of users is severely restrained in FMV whereas In-Game Engine animation allows scope for the story to be told. With music, voice-overs and scripted stories, gaming is gradually giving users more interaction. However, it is still the 3D artist’s task to endow as much personality as they can to the avatar. There is a whole range of body movements an avatar has to be given from the regular walking and jumping to the more complex use of weapons and reactions to an attack. The only thing affecting the fluidity

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HFR – The New Kid on the Block

Published on March 1, 2013, by in VFX.

One of the first impressions we get on seeing The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey in one of those special screens that showed the film in HFR 3D is that the film looks sped up. Images suddenly look flawlessly clear, and something seems amiss from the cinematic experience. That is made possible by the new kid on the block called the High Frame Rate (or HFR) technology. In HFR, the film is shot and projected at 48 frames per second, rather than the industry-standard 24 frames per second. One of the main reasons why 24 fps works is that this rate has a few more frames than required in establishing what we term “persistence of vision” that helps the audience in the suspension of disbelief. However, the audiences still have to fill in the intervals between frames. In HFR, the higher frame rate will mean the audience will have to spend

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Augmented Reality: Vision Redefined

Published on January 3, 2013, by in Animation.

The purpose of using Augmented Reality (AR) is to add information and meaning to a real object or place. It all started with the basic concept of superimposing an object or layer over another layer or object. It is nothing but an artificial view of a live feed composited in real time with some relevant overlaying information. For the past few decades, more so in the last 5-6 years, with the development of Smart Phones, this artificial view of the physical world – ’Augmented Reality’ has come out from the scientist’s lab and is gradually becoming a part of our daily life. People’s quest for seeing something more than what they can experience in real life led Morton L. Heilig, a film-maker, to design the first virtual reality experience in the 60’s. He patented a machine called Sensorama in 1961. For his research and inventions in this space he is

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